Categories
Accessibility iOS Development

Mobile Accessibility Links

This is a frequently updated list of links regarding mobile accessibility.

Guidelines & Standards

This section is focused on the European area because I am a citizen of the EU.

For more information, see my short blog post about the European Accessibility Act: https://mic.st/blog/european-accessibility-act-in-short/

LinkDescription
https://a11y-guidelines.orange.com/en/I really, really like these guidelines by the french telecommunications company Orange. The best thing is how well it’s structured. You can quickly find a solution for a lot of use case with short explanations, nice graphics and code snippets. Also, it’s open source! You can find the github repo here: https://github.com/Orange-OpenSource/a11y-guidelines.
https://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG21/quickref/The WCAG is the guideline when it comes to accessibility. The most recent version is 2.1. However, the guidelines are focused on web. Therefore, some rules are not directly applicable to mobile or need interpretation. The version 2.2 of the guidelines is currently in the making and should include more mobile related topics.
https://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=1202&langId=enQuick overview regarding the European accessibility act.
In the US there is already the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) that requires companies to care for accessibility.
https://www.etsi.org/deliver/etsi_en/301500_301599/301549/02.01.02_60/en_301549v020102p.pdfThe EN 301 549 is the European norm for digital accessibility. The standard is of importance together with the European Accessibility act (https://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=1485&langId=en). This norm also refers to WCAG.
The official documents can be difficult to digest and to apply. Therefore, I would rather start working with simpler guidelines that refer to the official ones.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wav3bzkb31UJon Gibbins describes in this presentation how he interprets the WCAG success criteria to be applicable to native mobile apps. He derives a list of success criteria that he uses to check native mobile apps for conformance.
Table with links about Accessibility guidelines and standards.

Tools

There are tools that can help building more accessible products (i.e conform to standards like EN 301 549).

Keep in mind: You should never solely rely on tools or automated testing.

Actually, there are dependencies and services promising automated conformance or something like that. This might work for simple things like spotting violations of color contrasts or checking for touch areas. It will get really difficult for more complex requirements like understandable user flows.

LinkDescription
https://material.io/resources/color/#!/This tool instantly checks the accessibility of color combinations for certain text sizes. There is also a simple preview with a mobile mockup. However, it is a little bit more advanced compared to similar palette generators. I would recommend to create a palette in an easier one (e.g. coolors.co or Color Hunt) and improve it using this one.
Table with links for tools helping to build accessible products.

Other articles or resources

LinkDescription
https://mobilea11y.com/This is a great resource of links and articles. Rob has also written a book on Mobile Accessibility which is a really great read.
https://www.afb.org/blindness-and-low-vision/using-technology/assistive-technology-products/mobile-appsThe American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) put together a lists accessible mobile apps. You might try some of the mentioned apps whenever you need some inspiration.
https://medium.com/rosberryapps/accessibility-what-you-need-to-know-about-mobile-app-development-for-people-with-special-needs-b52d713f8c95This is a very useful Medium article by Anastasia Egorina. It contains a lot of links to great resources and simple Dos and Don’ts with screenshots.
Table with articles and other resources about mobile accessibility.

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